__________

     
      paradis library

We believe in the transformative capacities of books, and we want
to share them as accessibly as possible with the folks of Miami.

We encourage deep engagement, critical reading, and ongoing conversations.

Collected Essays
James Baldwin

    With burning passion and jabbing, epigrammatic wit, Baldwin fearlessly articulated issues of race, democracy and American identity. Here are the complete texts of his early landmark collections, Notes of a Native Son (1955) and Nobody Knows My Name (1961), which established him as an essential intellectual voice of his time, fusing in unique fashion the personal, the literary, and the political.











A Map to the Door of No Return
Dionne Brand

Drawing on cartography, travels, narratives of childhood in the Caribbean, journeys across the Canadian landscape, African ancestry, histories, politics, philosophies and literature, Dionne Brand sketches the shifting borders of home and nation.











Parable of the Sower
Octavia Butler

When global climate change and economic crises lead to social chaos in the early 2020s, California becomes full of dangers. In a society where any vulnerability is a risk, fifteen-year-old Lauren Olamina suffers from hyperempathy, a debilitating sensitivity to others' emotions. What begins as a fight for survival soon leads to something much more: the birth of a new faith . . . and a startling vision of human destiny.











Death of the Posthuman
Claire Colebrook

Death of the PostHuman undertakes a series of critical encounters with the legacy of what had come to be known as ‘theory,’ and its contemporary supposedly post-human aftermath.











Krik Krak
Edwidge Danticat

Examining the lives of ordinary Haitians, particularly those struggling to survive under the brutal Duvalier regime, Danticat illuminates the distance between people's desires and the stifling reality of their lives.











Anti-Oedipus
Gilles Deleuze & Felix Guattari

“The traps of Anti-Oedipus are those of humor: so many invitations to let oneself be put out, to take one’s leave of the text and slam the door shut. The book often leads one to believe it is all fun and games, when something essential is taking place...the tracking down of all varieties of fascism, from the enormous ones that surround and crush us to the petty ones that constitute the tyrannical bitterness of our everyday lives.”











Wretched of the Earth
Frantz Fanon

Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth is a masterful and timeless interrogation of race, colonialism, psychological trauma, and revolutionary struggle. The Wretched of the Earth is an eternal touchstone for civil rights, anti-colonialism, psychiatric studies, and Black consciousness movements around the world.











Dispossed Lives
Marisa Fuentes

Fuentes takes us through the streets of Bridgetown with an enslaved runaway; inside a brothel run by a freed woman of color; in the midst of a white urban household in sexual chaos; to the gallows where enslaved people were executed; and within violent scenes of enslaved women's punishments. In the process, Fuentes interrogates the archive and its historical production to expose the ongoing effects of white colonial power that constrain what can be known about these women.











The Seeds We Planted
Noelani Goodyear-Ka’opua

The Seeds We Planted tells the story of Hālau Kū Māna, one of the only Hawaiian culture-based charter schools in urban Honolulu. Against the backdrop of the Hawaiian struggle for self-determination and the U.S. charter school movement, Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua reveals a critical tension: the successes of a school celebrating indigenous culture are measured by the standards of settler colonialism.











Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments
Saidiya Hartman

Saidiya Hartman examines the revolution of black intimate life that unfolded in Philadelphia and New York at the beginning of the twentieth century. Hartman narrates the story of this radical social transformation against the grain of the prevailing century-old argument about the crisis of the black family.











The Black Jacobins
CLR James

This powerful, intensely dramatic book is the definitive account of the Haitian Revolution of 1794-1803, a revolution that began in the wake of the Bastille but became the model for the Third World liberation movements from Africa to Cuba.











Lucy
Jamaica Kincaid

Lucy, a teenage girl from the West Indies, comes to North America to work as an au pair for Lewis and Mariah and their four children. With mingled anger and compassion, Lucy scrutinizes the assumptions and verities of her employers' world and compares them with the vivid realities of her native place.











The Marx-Engels Reader

This revised and enlarged edition of the leading anthology provides the essential writings of Marx and Engels--those works necessary for an introduction to Marxist thought and ideology.











This Bridge Called My Back
Cherrie Moraga and Gloria Anzaldua

Originally released in 1981, This Bridge Called My Back is a testimony to women of color feminism as it emerged in the last quarter of the twentieth century.











In the Break
Fred Moten

Moten investigates the provocative connections between jazz, sexual identity, and radical black politics, arguing that all black performance—culture, politics, sexuality, identity, and blackness itself—is improvisation.











The Birth of Tragedy & The Genealogy of Morals
Nietzsche

A polemical contribution to moral and political theory, Genealogy offers a critique of moral values and traces the historical evolution of concepts such as guilt, conscience, responsibility, law and justice.











Don't Let Me Be Lonely
Claudia Rankine

Rankine fuses the lyric, the essay, and the visual in this politically and morally fierce examination of solitude in the rapacious and media-driven assault on selfhood that is contemporary America.Rankine strives toward an unprecedented clarity-of thought while arguing that recognition of others is the only salvation for ourselves, our art, and our government.












Black Marxism
Cedric Robinson

Robinson demonstrates that efforts to understand black people's history of resistance solely through the prism of Marxist theory are incomplete and inaccurate. Black radicalism must be linked to the traditions of Africa and the unique experiences of blacks on western continents, Robinson argues, and any analyses of African American history need to acknowledge this.










In the Wake
Christina Sharpe

Activating multiple registers of "wake" Sharpe illustrates how Black lives are swept up and animated by the afterlives of slavery, and she delineates what survives despite such insistent violence and negation.











Anthropocene Back Loop
Stephanie Wakefield

In the face of climate chaos, post-truth politics, and growing tribalisms, it’s clear that liberalism’s old structures are unraveling. Drawing on resilience ecology, Stephanie Wakefield suggests we understand such phenomena to be indicators that we are entering the Anthropocene’s back loop, in which not only populations and climates are being upended but also physical and metaphysical grounds.

Giovanni's Room
James Baldwin

In the 1950s Paris of American expatriates, liaisons, and violence, a young man finds himself caught between desire and conventional morality. With a sharp, probing imagination, James Baldwin's now-classic narrative delves into the mystery of loving and creates a moving, highly controversial story of death and passion that reveals the unspoken complexities of the human heart.











At the Full and Change of the Moon
Dionne Brand

Written with lyrical fire in a chorus of vividly rendered voices, Dionne Brand's second novel is an epic of the African diaspora across the globe. Haunted by a legacy of passion and oppression, the children of Bola pass through two world wars and into the confusion, estrangement, and violence of the late twentieth century.











Wild Seed
Octavia Butler

Doro is an entity who changes bodies like clothes, killing his hosts by reflex -- or design. He fears no one -- until he meets Anyanwu. Anyanwu is a shapeshifter who can absorb bullets and heal with a kiss...and savage anyone who threatens those she loves. She fears no one -- until she meets Doro. Doro and Anyanwu weave together a pattern of destiny that not even immortals can imagine.











Occupy: A People Yet to Come
Andrew Conio

This collection of essays by world-leading scholars of Deleuze and Guattari examines how capitalism can be understood as a global abstract machine whose effects pervade all of life and how Occupy can be framed as a response to this as a heterogenic movement based on new tactics, revitalised democratic processes and nomadic systems of organisation.











An Autobiography
Angela Davis

From a childhood on Dynamite Hill in Birmingham, Alabama, to one of the most significant political trials of the century, Angela Davis describes in full the story of her life: from Carrie A. Tuggle Elementary School to the U.S. Communist Party; from her political activity in a New York high school to the Soledad Brothers; from the faculty of the Philosophy Department at UCLA to the FBI's list of the Ten Most Wanted Fugitives.











Souls of Black Folks
W.E.B. Du Bois

Du Bois played a key role in developing the strategy and program that dominated early 20th-century black protest in America. In this collection of essays, first published together in 1903, he eloquently affirms that it is beneath the dignity of a human being to beg for those rights that belong inherently to all mankind.











Towards a Global Idea of Race
Denise Ferreira da Silva

Rejecting the view that social categories of difference such as race and culture operate solely as principles of exclusion, Denise Ferreira da Silva presents a critique of modern thought that shows how racial knowledge and power produce global space.











The Guattari Reader
edited by Gary Genosko

This book makes available the broad canvas of Guattari's formidable theoretical and activist writings to provide an indispensable companion to the existing literature.











Prison Notebooks
Antonio Gramsci

An extensive anthology, including Gramsci’s most important writings while in prison on philosophy, history, Communist Party formation, the intellectuals, and other subjects.











The Limits to Capital
David Harvey

The Limits to Capital provides one of the best theoretical guides to the history and geography of capitalist development. Harvey takes the reader step by step through layers of crisis formation, beginning with Marx’s controversial argument concerning the falling rate of profit and closing with a timely foray into the geopolitical and geographical implications of Marx’s work.











The Complete Stories
Franz Kafka

The Complete Stories brings together all of Kafka’s stories. Kafka’s literary executor, released after Kafka’s death. With the exception of his three novels, the whole of Kafka’s narrative work is included in this volume.











Zami
Audre Lorde

ZAMI is a fast-moving chronicle. From the author’s vivid childhood memories in Harlem to her coming of age in the late 1950s, the nature of Audre Lorde’s work is cyclical. It especially relates the linkage of women who have shaped her. Lorde brings into play her craft of lush description and characterization.











Demonic Grounds
Katherine McKittrick

Demonic Grounds moves between past and present, archives and fiction, theory and everyday, to focus on places negotiated by black women during and after the transatlantic slave trade.











Beloved
Toni Morrison

Sethe, its protagonist, was born a slave and escaped to Ohio, but eighteen years later she is still not free. She has too many memories of Sweet Home, the beautiful farm where so many hideous things happened. And Sethe’s new home is haunted by the ghost of her baby, who died nameless and whose tombstone is engraved with a single word: Beloved.











Cruising Utopia
Jose Esteban Munoz

In a startling repudiation of what the LGBT movement has held dear, Munoz contends that queerness is instead a futurity bound phenomenon, a "not yet here" that critically engages pragmatic presentism. Part manifesto, part love-letter to the past and the future, Cruising Utopia argues that the here and now are not enough and issues an urgent call for the revivification of the queer political imagination.











Geontologies
Elizabeth Povinelli

Povinelli continues her project of mapping the current conditions of late liberalism by offering a bold retheorization of power. Finding Foucauldian biopolitics unable to adequately reveal contemporary mechanisms of power and governance, Povinelli describes a mode of power she calls geontopower, which operates through the regulation of the distinction between Life and Nonlife.











Mumbo Jumbo
Ishmael Reed

Mumbo Jumbo is Ishmael Reed’s brilliantly satiric deconstruction of Western civilization, a racy and uproarious commentary on our society. It is a trenchant and often biting look at black-white relations throughout history, from a keen observer of our culture.











Orientalism
Edward Said

In this wide-ranging, intellectually vigorous study, Said traces the origins of "orientalism" to the centuries-long period during which Europe dominated the Middle and Near East and, from its position of power, defined "the orient" simply as "other than" the occident. This entrenched view continues to dominate western ideas and, because it does not allow the East to represent itself, prevents true understanding.











Black, White and in Color
Hortense Spillers

A long-awaited collection of major essays by Hortense Spillers. Spanning her work from the early 1980s, and extending through her turn to cultural studies in the 1990s, these essays display her passionate commitment to reading as a fundamentally political act-one pivotal to rewriting the humanist project.











Paper Cadavers
Kirsten Weld

In Paper Cadavers, an inside account of the astonishing discovery and rescue of Guatemala's secret police archives, Kirsten Weld probes the politics of memory, the wages of the Cold War, and the stakes of historical knowledge production.

Go Tell It on the Mountain
James Baldwin

With lyrical precision, psychological directness, resonating symbolic power, and a rage that is at once unrelenting and compassionate, Baldwin tells the story of the stepson of the minister of a storefront Pentecostal church in Harlem one Saturday in March of 1935.











Gender Trouble
Judith Butler

Arguing that traditional feminism is wrong to look to a natural, 'essential' notion of the female, or indeed of sex or gender, Butler starts by questioning the category 'woman' and continues in this vein with examinations of 'the masculine' and 'the feminine'. Best known though also often misinterpreted is Butler's concept of gender as a reiterated social performance rather than the expression of a prior reality.











Discourse on Colonialism
Aime Cesaire

Aimé Césaire eloquently describes the brutal impact of capitalism and colonialism on both the colonizer and colonized, exposing the contradictions and hypocrisy implicit in western notions of "progress" and "civilization" upon encountering the "savage," "uncultured," or "primitive." Here, Césaire reaffirms African values, identity, and culture, and their relevance.











Red Skin, White Masks
Glen Coulthard

Coulthard challenges recognition as a method of organizing difference and identity in liberal politics, questioning the assumption that contemporary difference and past histories of destructive colonialism between the state and Indigenous peoples can be reconciled through a process of acknowledgment.











Dhalgren
Samuel Delaney

Bellona is a city at the dead center of the United States. Something has happened there. The population has fled. Strange portents appear in the cloud-covered sky. Into this disaster zone comes a young man—poet, lover, and adventurer—known only as the Kid. Tackling questions of race, gender, and sexuality, Dhalgren is a literary marvel and groundbreaking work of American magical realism.











Black Skin, White Masks
Frantz Fanon

A major influence on civil rights, anti-colonial, and black consciousness movements around the world, Black Skin, White Masks is the unsurpassed study of the black psyche in a white world. Hailed for its scientific analysis and poetic grace when it was first published in 1952, the book remains a vital force today from one of the most important theorists of revolutionary struggle, colonialism, and racial difference in history.











Discipline & Punish
Michel Foucault

“It is as if, finally, something new were emerging in the wake of Marx. It is as if a complicity about the State were finally broken. Foucault is not content to say that we must rethink certain notions; he does not even say it; he just does it, and in this way proposes new coordinates for praxis.”











Golden Gulag
Ruth Wilson Gilmore

Detailing crises that hit California’s economy with particular ferocity, Gilmore argues that defeats of radical struggles, weakening of labor, and shifting patterns of capital investment have been key conditions for prison growth.











Scenes of Subjection
Saidiya Hartman

In this provocative and original exploration of racial subjugation during slavery and its aftermath, Saidiya Hartman illumines the forms of terror and resistance that shaped black identity. Scenes of Subjection examines the forms of domination that usually go undetected; in particular, the encroachments of power that take place through notions of humanity, enjoyment, protection, rights, and consent.











Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston

The epic tale of Janie Crawford, whose quest for identity takes her on a journey during which she learns what love is, experiences life’s joys and sorrows, and come home to herself in peace.











Counternarratives
John Keene

Ranging from the seventeenth century to the present, and crossing multiple continents, Counternarratives draws upon memoirs, newspaper accounts, detective stories, and interrogation transcripts to create new and strange perspectives on our past and present.











From a Broken Bottle Traces of Perfume Still Emanate
Nathaniel Mackey

A project that began over thirty years ago, From a Broken Bottle is an epistolary novel that unfolds through N.’s intricate letters to the mysterious Angel of Dust. Unexpected, profound happenings take place as N. delves into music and art and the goings-on of his transmorphic Los Angeles-based jazz ensemble.











Sylvia Wynter: On Being Human as Praxis
edited by Katherine McKittrick

The contributors of this collection explore Sylvia Wynter’s stunning reconceptualization of the human in relation to concepts of blackness, modernity, urban space, the Caribbean, science studies, migratory politics, and the interconnectedness of creative and theoretical resistances.











Black & Blur
Fred Moten

Moten engages in a capacious consideration of the place and force of blackness in African diaspora arts, politics, and life. In these interrelated essays, Moten attends to entanglement, the blurring of borders, and other practices that trouble notions of self-determination and sovereignty within political and aesthetic realms.











Disidentifications
Jose Esteban Munoz

Muñoz looks at how those outside the racial and sexual mainstream negotiate majority culture—not by aligning themselves with or against exclusionary works but rather by transforming these works for their own cultural purposes.











Terrorist Assemblages
Jasbir Puar

Puar argues that configurations of sexuality, race, gender, nation, class, and ethnicity are realigning in relation to contemporary forces of securitization, counterterrorism, and nationalism. She examines how liberal politics incorporate certain queer subjects into the fold of the nation-state. Puar contends, however, that this tenuous inclusion of some queer subjects depends on the production of populations of Orientalized terrorist bodies.











An Anthropology of Marxism
Cedric Robinson

Offers Robinson’s analysis of the history of communalism that has been claimed by Marx and Marxists. Suggesting that the socialist ideal was embedded both in Western and non-Western civilizations and cultures long before the opening of the modern era, ultimately, it pushes back against Marx’s vision of a better society as rooted in a Eurocentric society, and cut off from its own precursors.











Assata: An Autobiography
Assata Shakur

With wit and candor, Assata Shakur recounts the experiences that led her to a life of activism and portrays the strengths, weaknesses, and eventual demise of Black and White revolutionary groups at the hand of government officials.











Ezili's Mirror
Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley

Drawing on her background as a literary critic as well as her quest to learn the lessons of her spiritual ancestors, Tinsley theorizes black Atlantic sexuality by tracing how contemporary queer Caribbean and African American writers and performers evoke Ezili. In so doing, Tinsley offers a model of queer black feminist theory that creates new possibilities for decolonizing queer studies.











Traces of History
Patrick Wolfe

Traces of History presents a new approach to race and to comparative colonial studies. This book shows how race marks and reproduces the different relationships of inequality into which Europeans have coopted subaltern populations: territorial dispossession, enslavement, confinement, assimilation, and removal.














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for locals only.


In-store pick up & drop off.


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Collected Essays
James Baldwin

    With burning passion and jabbing, epigrammatic wit, Baldwin fearlessly articulated issues of race, democracy and American identity. Here are the complete texts of his early landmark collections, Notes of a Native Son (1955) and Nobody Knows My Name (1961), which established him as an essential intellectual voice of his time, fusing in unique fashion the personal, the literary, and the political.











A Map to the Door of No Return
Dionne Brand

Drawing on cartography, travels, narratives of childhood in the Caribbean, journeys across the Canadian landscape, African ancestry, histories, politics, philosophies and literature, Dionne Brand sketches the shifting borders of home and nation.











Parable of the Sower
Octavia Butler

When global climate change and economic crises lead to social chaos in the early 2020s, California becomes full of dangers. In a society where any vulnerability is a risk, fifteen-year-old Lauren Olamina suffers from hyperempathy, a debilitating sensitivity to others' emotions. What begins as a fight for survival soon leads to something much more: the birth of a new faith . . . and a startling vision of human destiny.











Death of the Posthuman
Claire Colebrook

Death of the PostHuman undertakes a series of critical encounters with the legacy of what had come to be known as ‘theory,’ and its contemporary supposedly post-human aftermath.











Krik Krak
Edwidge Danticat

Examining the lives of ordinary Haitians, particularly those struggling to survive under the brutal Duvalier regime, Danticat illuminates the distance between people's desires and the stifling reality of their lives.











Anti-Oedipus
Gilles Deleuze & Felix Guattari

“The traps of Anti-Oedipus are those of humor: so many invitations to let oneself be put out, to take one’s leave of the text and slam the door shut. The book often leads one to believe it is all fun and games, when something essential is taking place...the tracking down of all varieties of fascism, from the enormous ones that surround and crush us to the petty ones that constitute the tyrannical bitterness of our everyday lives.”











Wretched of the Earth
Frantz Fanon

Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth is a masterful and timeless interrogation of race, colonialism, psychological trauma, and revolutionary struggle. The Wretched of the Earth is an eternal touchstone for civil rights, anti-colonialism, psychiatric studies, and Black consciousness movements around the world.











Dispossed Lives
Marisa Fuentes

Fuentes takes us through the streets of Bridgetown with an enslaved runaway; inside a brothel run by a freed woman of color; in the midst of a white urban household in sexual chaos; to the gallows where enslaved people were executed; and within violent scenes of enslaved women's punishments. In the process, Fuentes interrogates the archive and its historical production to expose the ongoing effects of white colonial power that constrain what can be known about these women.











The Seeds We Planted
Noelani Goodyear-Ka’opua

The Seeds We Planted tells the story of Hālau Kū Māna, one of the only Hawaiian culture-based charter schools in urban Honolulu. Against the backdrop of the Hawaiian struggle for self-determination and the U.S. charter school movement, Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua reveals a critical tension: the successes of a school celebrating indigenous culture are measured by the standards of settler colonialism.











Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments
Saidiya Hartman

Saidiya Hartman examines the revolution of black intimate life that unfolded in Philadelphia and New York at the beginning of the twentieth century. Hartman narrates the story of this radical social transformation against the grain of the prevailing century-old argument about the crisis of the black family.











The Black Jacobins
CLR James

This powerful, intensely dramatic book is the definitive account of the Haitian Revolution of 1794-1803, a revolution that began in the wake of the Bastille but became the model for the Third World liberation movements from Africa to Cuba.











Lucy
Jamaica Kincaid

Lucy, a teenage girl from the West Indies, comes to North America to work as an au pair for Lewis and Mariah and their four children. With mingled anger and compassion, Lucy scrutinizes the assumptions and verities of her employers' world and compares them with the vivid realities of her native place.











The Marx-Engels Reader

This revised and enlarged edition of the leading anthology provides the essential writings of Marx and Engels--those works necessary for an introduction to Marxist thought and ideology.











This Bridge Called My Back
Cherrie Moraga and Gloria Anzaldua

Originally released in 1981, This Bridge Called My Back is a testimony to women of color feminism as it emerged in the last quarter of the twentieth century.











In the Break
Fred Moten

Moten investigates the provocative connections between jazz, sexual identity, and radical black politics, arguing that all black performance—culture, politics, sexuality, identity, and blackness itself—is improvisation.











The Birth of Tragedy & The Genealogy of Morals
Nietzsche

A polemical contribution to moral and political theory, Genealogy offers a critique of moral values and traces the historical evolution of concepts such as guilt, conscience, responsibility, law and justice.











Don't Let Me Be Lonely
Claudia Rankine

Rankine fuses the lyric, the essay, and the visual in this politically and morally fierce examination of solitude in the rapacious and media-driven assault on selfhood that is contemporary America.Rankine strives toward an unprecedented clarity-of thought while arguing that recognition of others is the only salvation for ourselves, our art, and our government.











Black Marxism
Cedric Robinson

Robinson demonstrates that efforts to understand black people's history of resistance solely through the prism of Marxist theory are incomplete and inaccurate. Black radicalism must be linked to the traditions of Africa and the unique experiences of blacks on western continents, Robinson argues, and any analyses of African American history need to acknowledge this.











In the Wake
Christina Sharpe

Activating multiple registers of "wake" Sharpe illustrates how Black lives are swept up and animated by the afterlives of slavery, and she delineates what survives despite such insistent violence and negation.











Anthropocene Back Loop
Stephanie Wakefield

In the face of climate chaos, post-truth politics, and growing tribalisms, it’s clear that liberalism’s old structures are unraveling. Drawing on resilience ecology, Stephanie Wakefield suggests we understand such phenomena to be indicators that we are entering the Anthropocene’s back loop, in which not only populations and climates are being upended but also physical and metaphysical grounds.

Giovanni's Room
James Baldwin

In the 1950s Paris of American expatriates, liaisons, and violence, a young man finds himself caught between desire and conventional morality. With a sharp, probing imagination, James Baldwin's now-classic narrative delves into the mystery of loving and creates a moving, highly controversial story of death and passion that reveals the unspoken complexities of the human heart.











At the Full and Change of the Moon
Dionne Brand

Written with lyrical fire in a chorus of vividly rendered voices, Dionne Brand's second novel is an epic of the African diaspora across the globe. Haunted by a legacy of passion and oppression, the children of Bola pass through two world wars and into the confusion, estrangement, and violence of the late twentieth century.











Wild Seed
Octavia Butler

Doro is an entity who changes bodies like clothes, killing his hosts by reflex -- or design. He fears no one -- until he meets Anyanwu. Anyanwu is a shapeshifter who can absorb bullets and heal with a kiss...and savage anyone who threatens those she loves. She fears no one -- until she meets Doro. Doro and Anyanwu weave together a pattern of destiny that not even immortals can imagine.











Occupy: A People Yet to Come
Andrew Conio

This collection of essays by world-leading scholars of Deleuze and Guattari examines how capitalism can be understood as a global abstract machine whose effects pervade all of life and how Occupy can be framed as a response to this as a heterogenic movement based on new tactics, revitalised democratic processes and nomadic systems of organisation.











An Autobiography
Angela Davis

From a childhood on Dynamite Hill in Birmingham, Alabama, to one of the most significant political trials of the century, Angela Davis describes in full the story of her life: from Carrie A. Tuggle Elementary School to the U.S. Communist Party; from her political activity in a New York high school to the Soledad Brothers; from the faculty of the Philosophy Department at UCLA to the FBI's list of the Ten Most Wanted Fugitives.











Souls of Black Folks
W.E.B. Du Bois

Du Bois played a key role in developing the strategy and program that dominated early 20th-century black protest in America. In this collection of essays, first published together in 1903, he eloquently affirms that it is beneath the dignity of a human being to beg for those rights that belong inherently to all mankind.











Towards a Global Idea of Race
Denise Ferreira da Silva

Rejecting the view that social categories of difference such as race and culture operate solely as principles of exclusion, Denise Ferreira da Silva presents a critique of modern thought that shows how racial knowledge and power produce global space.











The Guattari Reader
edited by Gary Genosko

This book makes available the broad canvas of Guattari's formidable theoretical and activist writings to provide an indispensable companion to the existing literature.











Prison Notebooks
Antonio Gramsci

An extensive anthology, including Gramsci’s most important writings while in prison on philosophy, history, Communist Party formation, the intellectuals, and other subjects.











The Limits to Capital
David Harvey

The Limits to Capital provides one of the best theoretical guides to the history and geography of capitalist development. Harvey takes the reader step by step through layers of crisis formation, beginning with Marx’s controversial argument concerning the falling rate of profit and closing with a timely foray into the geopolitical and geographical implications of Marx’s work.











The Complete Stories
Franz Kafka

The Complete Stories brings together all of Kafka’s stories. Kafka’s literary executor, released after Kafka’s death. With the exception of his three novels, the whole of Kafka’s narrative work is included in this volume.











Zami
Audre Lorde

ZAMI is a fast-moving chronicle. From the author’s vivid childhood memories in Harlem to her coming of age in the late 1950s, the nature of Audre Lorde’s work is cyclical. It especially relates the linkage of women who have shaped her. Lorde brings into play her craft of lush description and characterization.











Demonic Grounds
Katherine McKittrick

Demonic Grounds moves between past and present, archives and fiction, theory and everyday, to focus on places negotiated by black women during and after the transatlantic slave trade.











Beloved
Toni Morrison

Sethe, its protagonist, was born a slave and escaped to Ohio, but eighteen years later she is still not free. She has too many memories of Sweet Home, the beautiful farm where so many hideous things happened. And Sethe’s new home is haunted by the ghost of her baby, who died nameless and whose tombstone is engraved with a single word: Beloved.











Cruising Utopia
Jose Esteban Munoz

In a startling repudiation of what the LGBT movement has held dear, Munoz contends that queerness is instead a futurity bound phenomenon, a "not yet here" that critically engages pragmatic presentism. Part manifesto, part love-letter to the past and the future, Cruising Utopia argues that the here and now are not enough and issues an urgent call for the revivification of the queer political imagination.











Geontologies
Elizabeth Povinelli

Povinelli continues her project of mapping the current conditions of late liberalism by offering a bold retheorization of power. Finding Foucauldian biopolitics unable to adequately reveal contemporary mechanisms of power and governance, Povinelli describes a mode of power she calls geontopower, which operates through the regulation of the distinction between Life and Nonlife.











Mumbo Jumbo
Ishmael Reed

Mumbo Jumbo is Ishmael Reed’s brilliantly satiric deconstruction of Western civilization, a racy and uproarious commentary on our society. It is a trenchant and often biting look at black-white relations throughout history, from a keen observer of our culture.











Orientalism
Edward Said

In this wide-ranging, intellectually vigorous study, Said traces the origins of "orientalism" to the centuries-long period during which Europe dominated the Middle and Near East and, from its position of power, defined "the orient" simply as "other than" the occident. This entrenched view continues to dominate western ideas and, because it does not allow the East to represent itself, prevents true understanding.











Black, White and in Color
Hortense Spillers

A long-awaited collection of major essays by Hortense Spillers. Spanning her work from the early 1980s, and extending through her turn to cultural studies in the 1990s, these essays display her passionate commitment to reading as a fundamentally political act-one pivotal to rewriting the humanist project.











Paper Cadavers
Kirsten Weld

In Paper Cadavers, an inside account of the astonishing discovery and rescue of Guatemala's secret police archives, Kirsten Weld probes the politics of memory, the wages of the Cold War, and the stakes of historical knowledge production.

Go Tell It on the Mountain
James Baldwin

With lyrical precision, psychological directness, resonating symbolic power, and a rage that is at once unrelenting and compassionate, Baldwin tells the story of the stepson of the minister of a storefront Pentecostal church in Harlem one Saturday in March of 1935.











Gender Trouble
Judith Butler

Arguing that traditional feminism is wrong to look to a natural, 'essential' notion of the female, or indeed of sex or gender, Butler starts by questioning the category 'woman' and continues in this vein with examinations of 'the masculine' and 'the feminine'. Best known though also often misinterpreted is Butler's concept of gender as a reiterated social performance rather than the expression of a prior reality.











Discourse on Colonialism
Aime Cesaire

Aimé Césaire eloquently describes the brutal impact of capitalism and colonialism on both the colonizer and colonized, exposing the contradictions and hypocrisy implicit in western notions of "progress" and "civilization" upon encountering the "savage," "uncultured," or "primitive." Here, Césaire reaffirms African values, identity, and culture, and their relevance.











Red Skin, White Masks
Glen Coulthard

Coulthard challenges recognition as a method of organizing difference and identity in liberal politics, questioning the assumption that contemporary difference and past histories of destructive colonialism between the state and Indigenous peoples can be reconciled through a process of acknowledgment.











Dhalgren
Samuel Delaney

Bellona is a city at the dead center of the United States. Something has happened there. The population has fled. Strange portents appear in the cloud-covered sky. Into this disaster zone comes a young man—poet, lover, and adventurer—known only as the Kid. Tackling questions of race, gender, and sexuality, Dhalgren is a literary marvel and groundbreaking work of American magical realism.











Black Skin, White Masks
Frantz Fanon

A major influence on civil rights, anti-colonial, and black consciousness movements around the world, Black Skin, White Masks is the unsurpassed study of the black psyche in a white world. Hailed for its scientific analysis and poetic grace when it was first published in 1952, the book remains a vital force today from one of the most important theorists of revolutionary struggle, colonialism, and racial difference in history.











Discipline & Punish
Michel Foucault

“It is as if, finally, something new were emerging in the wake of Marx. It is as if a complicity about the State were finally broken. Foucault is not content to say that we must rethink certain notions; he does not even say it; he just does it, and in this way proposes new coordinates for praxis.”











Golden Gulag
Ruth Wilson Gilmore

Detailing crises that hit California’s economy with particular ferocity, Gilmore argues that defeats of radical struggles, weakening of labor, and shifting patterns of capital investment have been key conditions for prison growth.











Scenes of Subjection
Saidiya Hartman

In this provocative and original exploration of racial subjugation during slavery and its aftermath, Saidiya Hartman illumines the forms of terror and resistance that shaped black identity. Scenes of Subjection examines the forms of domination that usually go undetected; in particular, the encroachments of power that take place through notions of humanity, enjoyment, protection, rights, and consent.











Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston

The epic tale of Janie Crawford, whose quest for identity takes her on a journey during which she learns what love is, experiences life’s joys and sorrows, and come home to herself in peace.











Counternarratives
John Keene

Ranging from the seventeenth century to the present, and crossing multiple continents, Counternarratives draws upon memoirs, newspaper accounts, detective stories, and interrogation transcripts to create new and strange perspectives on our past and present.











From a Broken Bottle Traces of Perfume Still Emanate
Nathaniel Mackey

A project that began over thirty years ago, From a Broken Bottle is an epistolary novel that unfolds through N.’s intricate letters to the mysterious Angel of Dust. Unexpected, profound happenings take place as N. delves into music and art and the goings-on of his transmorphic Los Angeles-based jazz ensemble.











Sylvia Wynter: On Being Human as Praxis
edited by Katherine McKittrick

The contributors of this collection explore Sylvia Wynter’s stunning reconceptualization of the human in relation to concepts of blackness, modernity, urban space, the Caribbean, science studies, migratory politics, and the interconnectedness of creative and theoretical resistances.











Black & Blur
Fred Moten

Moten engages in a capacious consideration of the place and force of blackness in African diaspora arts, politics, and life. In these interrelated essays, Moten attends to entanglement, the blurring of borders, and other practices that trouble notions of self-determination and sovereignty within political and aesthetic realms.











Disidentifications
Jose Esteban Munoz

Muñoz looks at how those outside the racial and sexual mainstream negotiate majority culture—not by aligning themselves with or against exclusionary works but rather by transforming these works for their own cultural purposes.











Terrorist Assemblages
Jasbir Puar

Puar argues that configurations of sexuality, race, gender, nation, class, and ethnicity are realigning in relation to contemporary forces of securitization, counterterrorism, and nationalism. She examines how liberal politics incorporate certain queer subjects into the fold of the nation-state. Puar contends, however, that this tenuous inclusion of some queer subjects depends on the production of populations of Orientalized terrorist bodies.











An Anthropology of Marxism
Cedric Robinson

Offers Robinson’s analysis of the history of communalism that has been claimed by Marx and Marxists. Suggesting that the socialist ideal was embedded both in Western and non-Western civilizations and cultures long before the opening of the modern era, ultimately, it pushes back against Marx’s vision of a better society as rooted in a Eurocentric society, and cut off from its own precursors.











Assata: An Autobiography
Assata Shakur

With wit and candor, Assata Shakur recounts the experiences that led her to a life of activism and portrays the strengths, weaknesses, and eventual demise of Black and White revolutionary groups at the hand of government officials.











Ezili's Mirror
Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley

Drawing on her background as a literary critic as well as her quest to learn the lessons of her spiritual ancestors, Tinsley theorizes black Atlantic sexuality by tracing how contemporary queer Caribbean and African American writers and performers evoke Ezili. In so doing, Tinsley offers a model of queer black feminist theory that creates new possibilities for decolonizing queer studies.











Traces of History
Patrick Wolfe

Traces of History presents a new approach to race and to comparative colonial studies. This book shows how race marks and reproduces the different relationships of inequality into which Europeans have coopted subaltern populations: territorial dispossession, enslavement, confinement, assimilation, and removal.

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